Faculty Spotlight February 2015: Kathy Moss

Kathy Moss

Kathy Moss celebrates more than 25 years with Mizzou.

The respiratory therapy field has seen a lot of changes throughout the years, from new equipment to new students; but one face has remained constant for more than 25 years.

In 1987 Kathryn Moss was asked to join the University of Missouri School of Health Professions to aid in the development of a consistent lab experience for respiratory therapy students. In the decades since her arrival, Moss has been an integral part of the respiratory therapy department and many of its changes.

“It’s been so rewarding to see the lab curriculum mature over the years and to see how it contributes to the success of our students and alumni,” Moss said. From her time at MU Moss has noticed that there are two things that distinguish the university’s respiratory therapy education from other institutions. Moss says the first of these is the opportunity for students to participate in clinical practice within the first semester of their entrance into the program. “The learning in clinical practice is so impactful. It benefits the students from the first week,” Moss said.

The second distinction Moss finds is that faculty members serve as clinical preceptors for student clinical experiences for the first two and a half semesters.

“It gives us the opportunity to be accountable for what students are learning in the classroom in a way that helps them develop sound clinical habits,” Moss said.

Moss describes that approach to teaching as intense “but impactful.” It is within those clinical experiences that Moss finds the part of her teaching she loves the most. For Moss, aiding in the students’ clinical course work is the most rewarding.

“I get to be there while students are in stressful situations and I get to see them realize they can think clearly in a stressful situation.” Moss said. “I like to watch them see that in themselves.”

Currently she is teaching three classes, one of which is a new addition to the field’s curriculum. The class “Current Problems in Respiratory Therapy” presents May graduates with an opportunity to explore hot topics in respiratory care. Through researching the latest issues in health care, students explore topics such as legislative advocacy and new diseases, topics for which books and research have not yet been developed.

“It’s been fun for me to see the students really embrace the challenge,” Moss said.

Over the years as all but one piece of respiratory therapy equipment has changed, so Moss has been challenged to keep learning. But the challenge is something she welcomes. As Moss reaches her final decade in teaching, she is finishing up her PhD program, an experience that she describes as both challenging and energizing.

The program allows for much overlap with her teaching responsibility. In her dissertation topic Moss chose an area where the answers discovered could contribute to the current discussions in respiratory therapy education.

Moss is looking at National Board for Respiratory Care (NDRC) exam scores as an indicator of professional competence. Through her research she aims to evaluate the respiratory therapy field’s push towards the requirement of higher academic degrees for practice.

“There is very little evidence that suggests clinicians who obtain higher academic degrees perform better.” Moss said. “Having the answer will enable us to make an evidence-based decision.”

From seeking challenges in research and teaching Moss continues throughout her tenure to strive to find exciting challenges that benefit herself, her students, the program and the field of respiratory therapy.


 

Article by Samantha Kummerer, SHP Communications

Congratulations to the School of Health Professions’ Class of 2014!

BLOG- MIZ ZOU grad caps

Congratulations to the SHP Class of 2014 who graduated on December 20th at the beautiful Missouri Theater in Downtown Columbia.

The commencement exercises were attended by Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin, SHP faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as loving family and friends of the graduates.

We are so proud of our graduates and wish them the best in their future endeavors! To see more photos, click here.

M-I-Z!

DMU Faculty and Students Receive Recognition at Conference

BLOG DMU Class at SDMS

Several DMU faculty members and students recently attended the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography conference in Louisville, KY and came home with honors and recognition!

MHS student Tiffany Floyd took home 2nd place in the SDMS W. Frederick Sample Student Excellence Award for Original Research. Her project was “Effects of Rockstar Energy Drink on Heart Function as Measured by Echocardiogram”.

The undergraduate students also presented posters of their research projects at the conference.

Attendance and participation in this national conference gives our DMU students exposure to leaders in the sonography field, state-of-the-art equipment, and networking opportunities across the nation.

Congratulations to all our DMU students and faculty!

OT/PT Departments Host Successful Open House

PTOT open house FOR BLOG

Over 50 prospective students attended the SHP Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy Open House last week! They represented several cities across Missouri, including: Centralia, Kirksville, Columbia,  St. Louis, Barnhart, Jefferson City, Cape Girardeau, Troy, Carthage, Springfield, and Clinton. There were also students from Iowa and Illinois.

Students participated in interactive stations, won door prizes, attended advising sessions and held conversations with current students and faculty, to name a few activities.

For more photos of SHP OT and PT representatives engaging with prospective students, click here.

SHP Career Fair Huge Success

career fair for blog

The SHP Career Fair was a huge success! There were more than 275 students in attendance, 60 organizations, and a photo booth for students to take a professional picture. Many employers commented that it was well attended and organized. Kudos to all who supported the event! To see more photos from the fair, click here.

Great Turnout for SHP Involvement Fair!

involvement fair

Thank you to the SHP students, parents, alumni, and friends who attended the SHP Involvement Fair and Open House on Friday, September 19th. We had a great turnout!

The Involvement Fair provided an avenue for students to check out available opportunities and to get involved in health professions student organizations. Advising and Career Services were a part of the event as well.

Thank You for Making Our 2014 Pancake Breakfast Another Success!

pancake breakfast

On Saturday, September 20th, we held our annual Family Weekend Pancake Breakfast & SHP Scholarship Fundraiser!

We’d like to thank all the students, faculty, staff and families who came out to make it another huge success. Approximately $400 was raised for the SHP Scholarship fund.

To see just how much fun we had, click here.

See you next year!

SHP Invites Community to Fundraiser for MU Speech & Hearing Clinic and Preschool on October 7

Lets Talk-Blog

Columbia, Mo. Sept. 20, 2014: Adults and children from central Missouri attended over 5,000 therapy sessions in 2013 at the Robert G. Combs Language Preschool and the MU Speech and Hearing Clinic.  This was made possible by dedicated faculty and student clinicians as well as by generous financial support from the community and from the Columbia Valley of the Scottish Rite

Mizzou’s School of Health Professions will host its 4th Annual Let’s Talk fundraiser on October 7th from 6-8pm at Bleu Restaurant in Downtown Columbia. Members of the community, public health organizations and any other interested parties are welcome to attend. The cost is $30 per person and includes appetizers and drink tickets. To purchase tickets, or get more information, call Ty Hopkins at 573-882-4209. Childcare will also be provided at no cost by registering at: http://goo.gl/vvRiEm

Let’s Talk is our largest fundraiser of the year and it directly benefits children in need of speech-language therapy in Mid-Missouri,” says Dr. Judith Goodman, Communication Science & Disorders Department Chair and Associate Professor at SHP. “Our preschool program is unique in Columbia. Children get services backed by the most up-to-date research in a language-rich environment with a very low child-clinician ratio.”

“We are excited to host the Let’s Talk fundraiser again. The financial support plays a significant part in us being able to provide the care and resources to those in need of therapy treatment, but unable to receive it due to financial challenges,” says Greta Hull, Director of R.G. Combs Language Preschool.

“This annual fundraiser is such a wonderful event and is so important to our clinic,” says Leanna Lawrence, Director of the MU Speech and Hearing Clinic. “The funds raised, which allow us to offer scholarships and purchase much needed therapy materials, enable us to better meet the needs of our clients.”

The MU School of Health Professions (SHP) is the University of Missouri system’s only school of health professions and the state’s only such public program located on a health sciences campus. Health professionals account for more than 60 percent of the total U.S. health care workforce and represent more than half of the fastest growing occupations in the country according to the Bureau for Labor Statistics. With programs in rehabilitation, health promotion, diagnostic and imaging sciences, graduates of the School of Health Professions fill critical roles in health care.


The Robert G. Combs Language Preschool was opened by the MU Department of Communication Science and Disorders with the generous support ofthe Scottish Rite.  This preschool serves children aged 2 to 5 years with or without speech and language difficulties.  MU Communication Science and Disorders seniors and graduate students are clinicians for this preschool under the direct supervision of certified faculty.  Given the intense speech and language focus of this program, a very low clinician to student ratio is maintained, approximating 1 clinician for every 2-3 students.


The MU Speech & Hearing Clinic was established more than 50 years ago to provide a full range of diagnostic and clinical speech-language services to children and adults with a wide variety of communication needs. Group and individual therapy sessions are available, based on the needs of each client. All services at the MU Speech and Hearing Clinic are provided by graduate student clinicians in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders. These student clinicians are closely supervised by faculty members who hold certification in speech-language pathology.

The Let’s Talk Fundraiser is held annually by the School of Health Professions. Members of the media are invited to attend. Dr. Judith Goodman, Greta Hull, and Leanna Lawrence and others will be available for interviews on request.  

### For more information or to schedule an interview please contact Megan Gill at 573-882-7974 or gillm@missouri.edu ###

School of Health Professions Hosts Dr. Jennifer Wisdom October 3.

Wisdom-Blog

Columbia, Mo. Sept. 9, 2014:  “Pragmatic Mixed Methods Research” is the topic of the presentation by Dr. Jennifer Wisdom on Friday, October 3, 2014 from 1-2pm in the Mark Twain Ballroom (N201/202) of Memorial Student Union. Jennifer Pelt Wisdom, PhD, MPH is Associate Vice President for Research and Professor of Health Policy at George Washington University.

“The University of Missouri and the School of Health Professions have a stake in improving the overall health paradigm in our community. Dr. Wisdom will discuss the applicability of a mixed methods approach in health services research – a discussion which has broad implications for researchers in the School of Health Professions and throughout the MU Health System.” said Dr. Kristofer Hagglund, Dean of the MU School of Health Professions. Wisdom’s presentation is the Fall 2014 installment of the Scholarship & Discovery Lecture Series.

Dr. Wisdom is a licensed clinical psychologist and academic researcher whose work has specialized in the organization, delivery, and quality of health care. She uses quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches to study the intersection of health care policy and practice. Recent projects include federally funded studies of the impact of a statewide intervention to reduce psychiatric polypharmacy in children and an investigation of how publicly funded child/adolescent behavioral health organizations adopt evidence-based treatments and other practice innovations.

Members of the community, public health organizations and any other interested parties are welcome to attend. The event is Friday, October 3 at 1pm in the Mark Twain Ballroom (N201/202) of the Memorial Student Union on the MU Campus.

The MU School of Health Professions (SHP) is the University of Missouri system’s only school of health professions and the state’s only such public program located on a health sciences campus. Health professionals account for more than 60 percent of the total U.S. health care workforce and represent more than half of the fastest growing occupations in the country according to the Bureau for Labor Statistics. With programs in rehabilitation, health promotion, diagnostic and imaging sciences, graduates of the School of Health Professions fill critical roles in health care.

The Scholarship & Discovery Lecture Series is hosted once per semester by the School of Health Professions. Members of the media are invited to attend. Dr. Wisdom and others will be available for interviews on request.  

 

### For more information or to schedule an interview please contact Megan Gill at 573-882-7974 or gillm@missouri.edu ###

Department of Health Psychology Intern Published in Schizophrenia Research Journal

jarrett and brain

Jarett Roseberry is a clinical psychology intern for the Missouri Health Science Psychology Consortium, which includes the Department of Health Psychology at the University of Missouri School of Health Professions. His manuscript, “Limited practice effects and evaluation of expectation for change: MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery,” was recently accepted for publishing in Schizophrenia Research, the official journal of the Schizophrenia International Research Society. Roseberry’s manuscript was his thesis project for his graduate program, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science (RFUMS), and was a collaborative effort with his academic/research advisor, Dr. S. Kristian Hill.

“The reason we are interested in cognition within schizophrenia is that prior research has shown cognitive deficits are the leading causes for functional deficits for people with a schizophrenia disorder, and functional deficits are the main financial and societal difficulties for schizophrenia spectrum disorder,” Roseberry said. “So my paper was designed to examine differential practice effects between schizophrenia spectrum patients who were clinically stable and on a stable medication regimen compared to demographically similar controls.”

 

Roseberry and Hill also wanted to examine possible expectations for change on the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), which is the main neuropsychological/cognitive assessment used to assess cognition in schizophrenia spectrum patients. This can be used to assess if a change in performance on the MCCB is a practice effect or meaningful change, which can help future researchers determine if medication effects are having a positive impact on cognition or not.

Currently, Roseberry works with the DHP neuropsychology clinic and with Health/Rehabilitation psychology at the Rusk Rehabilitation Center. With DHP, he completes neuropsychological assessments, such as interviewing with patients and family, performing cognitive assessments, and providing feedback with patients on what they learn from those assessments. At Rusk, he works with stroke patients, patients with vascular difficulties, and lower extremity amputees to ensure that patients have efficient and effective stays for proper physical and emotional healing.

Roseberry said he owes his interest in the DHP internship to the training it provides in neuropsychology and rehabilitation psychology, as well as the variable and unique patient population. His supervisor, Professor Brick Johnstone, said DHP interns learn to be rehabilitation, health, or neuropsychologists, and when they are done at MU they usually go on to fellowships to specialize in one of those areas.

“The clinical experience here is wonderful for a variety of reasons,” Roseberry said. Now schizophrenia researchers all over the world can read about his clinical experience in his manuscript, set to be published soon in Schizophrenia Research. 

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